U.N messenger of peace Jane Goodall makes an appearance at the end of a new music video meant to inspire international action on rapid climate change. ©From the video “Love Song to the Earth,” produced by Jerry Cope and Toby Gad

U.N messenger of peace Jane Goodall makes an appearance at the end of a new music video meant to inspire international action on rapid climate change. ©From the video “Love Song to the Earth,” produced by Jerry Cope and Toby Gad

There are reams of scientific studies on the rapid climate change we are now experiencing, all showing us why we need to act now if we want to avoid environmental disaster. Yet, it seems, we still fail to see the urgency. That’s when the artists of the world can step in and try to move us in ways that research-based facts don’t.

In the video below, a “Love Song to the Earth” contains a positive message about how precious our only planet is. Written by Natasha Bedingfield, Toby Gad, Sean Paul and John Shanks—and produced by Jerry Cope and Toby Gad—it features vocal performances by Jon Bon Jovi, Paul McCartney, Sheryl Crow and Fergie, among others.

Sometimes it is the artists of the world who speak to us in ways that can move us most. ©From the video “Love Song to the Earth,” produced by Jerry Cope and Toby Gad

Sometimes it is the artists of the world who speak to us in ways that can move us most. ©From the video “Love Song to the Earth,” produced by Jerry Cope and Toby Gad

Songwriter Natasha Bedingfield says that she and her fellow lyricists wanted to write a song about how loving something makes you want to look after it. While many people, she says, are turning a blind eye to what’s going on environmentally, the song is a reminder that having ownership of our world means taking care of it. She hopes the song will help people feel empowered to do something about rapid climate change rather than be paralyzed by fear.

Every time the song is purchased, streamed or shared, the royalties go directly towards the efforts of Friends of the Earth to keep fossil fuels in the ground and lower carbon emissions, and to the work of the United Nations Foundation to inspire international action on climate change.

So share it and sing it. It’s a catchy tune. Let’s hope its message catches on.

Here’s to finding your true places and natural habitats,

Candy